John Humphrys: goodbye to Today

John Humphrys. Photo: BBC

Britain’s politicians will sleep more easily after this week. The interviewer they fear most, John Humphrys, is leaving Radio 4’s Today programme after 32 years.

Back in 1987, Margaret Thatcher was about to win her third term. People were starting to get concerned about global warming. And Radio 4’s Today programme had established itself as the show that set the nation’s agenda led by legendary broadcaster Brian Redhead.

I was a fan of Today from my early days. While school friends in the Seventies tuned in to Radio 1’s breakfast show, my bedside radio was set to Radio 4. I timed my morning routine to the schedule. I loved Redhead’s wit and the way he switched between caustic treatment of shifty politicians and kindness towards ordinary people who found themselves in the news.

John Humphrys quickly established himself as Redhead’s successor after Brian’s tragically early death in 1994. I thoroughly enjoyed his encounters with Michael Heseltine and Kenneth Clarke in the 8.10am interview in the run up to the 1997 general election. The Conservatives were clearly going to lose by a landslide to Tony Blair’s New Labour but the two impresarios of the Tory party had a compelling presence that few current politicians of any party can match.

My family shares similar roots to the famous broadcaster. Like me, he was born in Cardiff, not far from my grandmother’s birthplace in Splott, and went to Cardiff High School – in its grammar school days, as did my father. (It had become a comprehensive by the time I started in 1975.) Like Mum and Dad, he started his journalism career on the Penarth Times. He was the first reporter on the scene of the Aberfan disaster in 1966, and later said that nothing in his career compared to the tragic landslide that overwhelmed the Welsh village school, killing 116 children and 28 adults.

For me, the most unforgettable Humphrys interview in recent years was the one that cost the job of his ultimate boss, BBC director-general George Entwistle, in 2012. Humphrys interviewed Entwistle at the height of the Jimmy Savile scandal. The BBC boss came across as utterly out of his depth and ill-informed. I described the interview in my blog as the director-general’s exit interview and so it proved: he resigned hours later.

Photo: BBC

John Humphrys is right to go now. He has been criticised as being out of touch with the times. That may be true – the 76 year presenter appeared uncomfortable with the understandable backlash against the fact that he and other male presenters are paid more than their female peers. And Today itself can feel heavy compared with the livelier offering from the BBC’s 5 Live breakfast show. But John Humphrys has been an essential part of the national debate over the past 32 years. I will miss my fellow Cardiffian on my drive to work.

Land’s End to John O’Groats – Day 5, Monmouth to Clun

Clun: a lovely destination on a sunny day

This post recounts the fifth day of my 14 day LEJOG19 adventure, in August 2019. For tips based on my experience, please go to my blogpost How to ride Land’s End to John O’Groats. Read Day 4: Street to Monmouth

This was a shorter and easier day: just 58 miles. But it didn’t feel like it over the first five miles, a constant ascent out of the Wye valley. Just as I remembered from my 2002 ride! This prompted a thought that was confirmed as the days unfolded: I much prefer ‘proper’ hills to ascents that don’t look serious but go on for ever. But the weather was fine, and once we got to the village of St Weonards the riding was more enjoyable. This small place has cannily placed a Land’s End to John O’Groats fingerpost outside its shop. They obviously get lots of people like us stopping to take photos and buying things there!

Pembridge

I was looking forward to our lunch stop at Pembridge, Herefordshire. This village in the Arrow valley, like nearby Weobley, is a gorgeous collection of black and white timbered buildings. We had lunch in Pembridge in 2002 and it proved as lovely this time as I remembered. We sat under the 16th century market hall and took a moment in the sunshine to admire the unusual separate church bell tower. A perfect place to rest on a sunny summer’s day.

Relaxing in Clun

The rest of the day was uneventful, with an easy ride to Clun. I couldn’t help thinking of the words of AE Houseman from A Shropshire Lad:

Clunton and Clunbury,
Clungunford and Clun,
Are the quietest places
Under the sun.

Walking over the ancient bridge up to the castle ruins, I knew exactly what he meant.

Clun castle
Not so quiet tonight: the music man

That said, Clun wasn’t quite so quiet that evening when one of our group, Nigel, was invited to play the ukulele by a group playing in the Sun Inn!

Day’s stats

58 miles, 3,858 feet climbing, 4 hrs 18 minutes cycling, 13.4 mph average speed

Read Day 6, Clun to Northwich

Land’s End to John O’Groats – Day 4, Street to Monmouth

About to cross Brunel’s masterpiece.

This post recounts the fourth day of my 14 day LEJOG19 adventure, in August 2019. For tips based on my experience, please go to my blogpost How to ride Land’s End to John O’Groats. Read Day 3, Moretonhampstead to Street.

What a fabulous day’s cycling! We crossed the Severn Bridge into Wales, which was an emotional moment for me, born in Cardiff. But there were other magical moments, including passing Wells cathedral, crossing Clifton suspension bridge and having a brew stop in glorious sunshine next to the ruins of Tintern Abbey.

Glastonbury

For once, we avoided big climbs after lunch and brew stops. Instead, the day began with the Somerset levels. This is such a magical landscape, with Glastonbury Tor rising mysteriously high above the levels, and the quirky town of Glastonbury with the whiff of incense hanging in the air as we cycled through on the way to Wells. The inevitable downpour greeted us as we reached England’s smallest city, but magically the shower gave way to sunshine as we reached the beautiful cathedral.

The hill of the day followed – the climb onto the Mendips – which was a long ascent but by today we had got into a pattern for these hills: choose a low gear and take your time, rising from the saddle from time to time to vary things. It didn’t seem long before we were enjoying the long descent to Chew Magna Lake, which was bigger than I remembered it – and a lovely spot for a brew stop!

Clifton suspension bridge

The next stretch towards Bristol was a bit of a slog – a busy road and dull scenery. But the reward was cycling over Clifton suspension bridge, Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s masterpiece, finished after his death. This is an example of how Peak Tours is so good at creating routes with unforgettable experiences. (Cycling through Edinburgh was another.) I was just as impressed by the route to the Severn Bridge, which was surprisingly rural compared with the route we took on my 2002 LEJOG, which went over the M5 Avonmouth bridge footbridge and past various chemical plants.

Over the Severn Bridge to Wales

The Severn Bridge has featured in my life for over 50 years, linking my Cardiff birthplace with homes, family and friends in England. It replaced the old Aust ferry in 1966, but remains the only cycle route over the mighty estuary below Gloucester. It was amazingly windy up there – which made the wind-free Forth crossing in Scotland six days later a surprise!

Croeso i Gymru – welcome to Wales!

I felt emotional as we crossed into Wales and saw the familiar bilingual road signs. Unfortunately, there isn’t a welcome to Wales sign on the cycle path – a missed photo opportunity that the Welsh government should address!

Tintern Abbey – afternoon tea

We had a lovely ride along the Wye valley to Monmouth, fortunately just days after the A466 reopened so avoiding a hilly diversion at St Arvans. The sun was shining at our most scenic brew stop yet at Tintern Abbey – and we had Welsh cakes to celebrate our arrival in Wales.

I couldn’t resist!

It was just a short ride from Tintern to Monmouth, the historic border town, and we crossed the border back into England for a few miles with the beautiful Wye to our side. We were staying in the King’s Arms, an old coaching inn that’s now a Wetherspoons hotel. Our bikes had an equally historic home for the night – the Shire Hall opposite!

The Shire Hall and Charles Rolls

I had a lovely evening in Monmouth catching up with my cousin Wendy and family. There was a poignant aspect to this as on my LEJOG stay in the town in 2002 I had dinner with my father and late mother. Happy memories.

Day’s stats

65 miles, 3,865 feet climbing, 12.7 mph average.

Read Day 5 – Monmouth to Clun

Thoughts on Wales beating England to Rugby World Cup knockout stage

Wales beat Fiji to reach Rugby World Cup 2015 knock out stage

Wales beat Fiji to reach Rugby World Cup 2015 knock out stage

In the end, the Group of Death proved nothing of the sort for Wales’s Rugby World Cup dreams. I was privileged to watch the victories over Uruguay and Fiji at the Millennium Stadium – but the real glory was our magnificent victory over England at Twickenham last weekend.

I still expected England to beat Australia – they have a good record against the Wallabies – but the hosts were woeful, going down to their worst ever defeat at HQ to Australia. Stuart Lancaster’s obsessive tinkering crashed England’s world cup chariot after just 16 days.

I’m thrilled that Wales are through. It’s extraordinary that a team so decimated with injuries should have the power to overcome tough opponents in England and Fiji. It speaks volumes for team spirit and their extraordinary coach, Warren Gatland, who has now plotted three wins at Twickenham in eight seasons. Australia will be tougher opponents, but that’s no longer a must-win match.

I’m also sorry that England are out. They didn’t deserve to progress, but the tournament is diminished by the host’s departure from their own party. And millions of England fans including many friends are feeling the intense pain of a premature exit. Blame the crazy decision to make the draw almost three years before the opening ceremony. Back in 2012, Wales slipped down the world rankings because we lost an extra autumn international to the Wallabies. As a result, the authorities placed four of the nations ranked in the top 10 on the eve of the tournament – Wales, Australia, England and Fiji – in the same group. Let’s hope they learn the lesson.

Meanwhile, the Welsh party continues!

Cymru am byth!

Cymru am byth!

Cardiff, Wales, Monmouthshire and England

Monmouthshire in Cardiff

The authorities once thought this part of Cardiff was in England

Today’s Daily Telegraph includes a letter from a Cardiff reader Barrie Cooper complaining that BT insists on sending him a Newport phone directory because he lives in east Cardiff. This prompted schoolboy memories of a time when Cardiff’s eastern suburbs were technically part of England. Not that any of us accepted that for a moment…

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In praise of Newport, NATO’s venue

Not many cities can claim to have hosted a Ryder Cup and NATO summit within four years. Newport, South Wales is in a very exclusive club.

I have affectionate memories of Newport as it’s the place I started work in 1986. I was one of the few who commuted from Cardiff rather than the other way round. 

It was good to see the sun shining this week as world leaders gathered at the Celtic Manor, in contrast with the rain that blighted the opening of the Ryder Cup in 2010. (I jeered those who asked who decided to hold a golf tournament in Wales – as if it has never rained at Wimbledon, Lord’s or Wembley…)

Some in South Wales have complained about the disruption – but it’s a small price to pay for the priceless publicity Wales earned this week. We have long been in the shadow of Ireland and Scotland, and we must grab every opportunity to be centre stage. 

President Obama, David Cameron and other NATO leaders at Cardiff Castle.

President Obama, David Cameron and other NATO leaders at Cardiff Castle.

The Ordnance Survey map addict

One of the joys of browsing in a real, rather than online, bookshop is coming across a brilliant book on a subject you’d never think of reading about. So I was chuffed to discover Map Addict by Mike Parker, published by Collins, during a holiday visit to Waterstone’s in Dorchester, Dorset.

OS metric 50:000 map Rhondda

Ordnance Survey goes metric: the Rhondda, 1970s

I’ve blogged before about my love of maps and the map’s evolution from a printed sheet to an icon on a smartphone. Parker’s book brought back many more memories – such as the lack of any photo on the cover of the original Ordnance Survey maps that replaced the much-loved one inch series. And the fact the 1:50 000 series index map, showing which map covered which part of Great Britain, was cut by a line across the country indicating that the northern maps would only appear two years later, in 1976.

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Cardiff Bay before regeneration

Cardiff Bay before regeneration

Atlantic Wharf, Cardiff, January 1986

(This post was inspired by www.wearecardiff.co.uk)

Cardiff has changed dramatically over the past 30 years. It’s hard to imagine how different the old Tiger Bay docklands looked before the Cardiff Bay redevelopment and Cardiff Bay barrage was announced by Margaret Thatcher’s Welsh Secretary Nicholas Edwards in 1986.

Dad and I visited the docks regularly and took these photos on a bitterly cold day at the start of 1986. We liked the look of the imposing warehouse on the right (east) bank of the Bute East Dock.

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The price of coal: Soma and Senghenydd

Senghenydd mining disaster victim

Senghenydd disaster casualty

Senghenydd colliery disaster victim

Another disaster, another victim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The world has been shocked by the terrible coal mining disaster at Soma in Turkey. It seems incredible in 2014 that hundreds can be lost in a colliery catastrophe.

My mind went back to a small Welsh village called Senghenydd, scene of Britain’s worst ever mining disaster in October 1913, which killed 439 men and boys and a rescuer. The tragedy came 12 years after 81 men died in an explosion at the same Universal pit. How could such a small community cope with such grief? But in those days – to the mine owners – life was cheap. British mining later became relatively safer, but as recently as 1960 45 men and boys died at Six Bells colliery in Monmouthshire.

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Remembering LTC Rolt

Nant Gwernol station, Talyllyn Railway

LTC Rolt’s legacy: the Talyllyn at Nant Gwernol

Few people did more to save Britain’s old railways and canals than LTC Rolt, who died 40 years ago this month. He was one of the founders of the Inland Waterways Association and the Talyllyn Railway Preservation Society, and ran the Talyllyn in its early summers as the world’s first preserved railway.

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